Intergenerational collaboration

Posted by Lila Rousselet on

On this fine day, I highly recommend that you read Whitney Bauck’s article for Refinery 29, Sustainable Fashion Cross-Generational Collaboration Progress.

This article really resonated with me. 

During Fashion Revolution week at the end of April, we presented portraits of the people we work with. You may have noticed that most of them are much older than me.

Throughout the article, Whitney Bauck refers to the ecological movement that has actively tried to combine young leadership energy with the expertise of their elders: “the result is a powerful alchemy of two parties that can join forces to create real change”. She insists on the fact that it would be in the fashion industry’s best interest to do the same, and I share this opinion.

Throughout my life experiences, I noticed that intergenerational alliances are often very stimulating and efficient.

The author makes a wonderful parallel between the plant kingdom and crossed pollination in her article.

“The kind of intergenerational community that brings together the urgency of youthwith the embodied wisdom of age is not as present as it should be in the sustainablefashion movement.” 

Here are a few examples: 

Joe – 60 years of labor.

He is the man from whom I’ve learned the most.

What I value most in this relationship, is the confidence that came to be with the years, the sharing, the listening, the benevolence. He supported me at the very beginning of Montloup’s adventure and answered my every question without judgment. I feel as though, in return, my eco-conscious perspective and wishes challenges him. I also have much enthusiasm and attentive listening to offer him, as well as occasional coffee. 

Joe is also the man leading the knitting crusade. His team involves quite a few other members, such as Mario the technician (above, on the left), who taught me how to take down an industrial knitting machine.

The third person I’d like to mention is Sebastiano (above, on the right), the one who taught me to knit and fix machines. He is now retired, and has given me his precious toolbox, a treasure I will keep for a very long time.

I’ve learned from each of them and will keep doing so every day. I believe that the day I will stop learning, is the day I will have to consider a career change.

 

 

 

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